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Research: Sawmill Database

Alpha-Numeric Key: NA-126
Corporate Name: Galloway & Wright Lumber Company
Local Name: Clevenger
Owner Name: Joe P. Clevenger of Clevenger Lumber Company. Galloway & Wright Lumber Company .
Location: North of Durst Road and along the east bank of the Moral Bayou, west of Nacogdoches
County: Nacogdoches
Years in Operation: 3 years
Start Year: 1899
End Year: 1901
Decades: 1890-1899,1900-1909
Period of Operation: 1899 to 1901
Town: West of Nacogdoches
Company Town: 2
Peak Town Size: Unknown
Mill Pond:
Type of Mill: Lumber
Sawmill Pine Sawmill Hardwood Sawmill Cypress Sawmill
Planer Planer Only Shingle Paper
Plywood Cotton Grist Unknown
Other
Power Source: 100 horsepower steam engine
Horse Mule Oxen Water
Water Overshot Water Turbine Diesel Unknown
Pit Steam Steam Circular Steam Band
Gas Electricity Other
Maximum Capacity: 
Capacity Comments: Unknown
Produced:
Rough Lumber Planed Lumber Crossties Timbers
Lathe Ceiling Unknown Beading
Flooring Paper Plywood Particle Board
Treated Other
Equipment: Sawmill
Company Tram:
Associated Railroads: None
Historicial Development: Local and state-wide newspapers reported that Joe Clevenger entered the lumber business about 1898. His original mill was located about two miles west of Nacogdoches about 1899. Nacogdoches County Deed Records note transactions beginning as early as 1888 and extending to 1910 in which Clevenger was buying and selling land two to three and a half miles west of Nacogdoches. Much of the land is north of Durst Road and along the east bank of Moral Bayou. The sawmill was probably located in the Juan de Acosta grant. When he cutout the timber, Clevenger moved in 1901 eight miles east of town, then moved to the final location on the Texas and New Orleans Railway in 1902. Galloway & Wright Lumber Company bought the Joe P. Clevenger Mill and reported it was temporarily closing the plant down in April, 1900. The paper reported on February 27, 1901 that Joe Clevenger sold his lumber on the mill yard to C. C. Galloway and would begin tearing up his machinery in a few days and moving it Dorr Creek on the Texas & New Orleans Railroad, where he would put in a much larger mill and proceed to cut some fine pine timber. The local newspaper mentioned March 6, 1901, that Joe Clevenger moved his sawmill machinery from west of town to a location about eight miles east of town on the new railroad. The great machinery passed through the town “yesterday.” Clevenger had cut up almost all the standing timber at the old mill, where he had been for about two years, and had to move to “tall timber.”
Research Date: MCJ 02-10-96
Prepared By: M Johnson