follow us on twitter   follow us on facebook  


Email Page Print Page

Exhibits & Collections

Temporary Exhibits

If These Woods Could Talk: The Thompson Lumber Company in East Texas, 1908

This photographic exhibit tells the story of a typical day at one of the Thompson Lumber Company's three east Texas sites. This exhibit is available for display at east Texas venues. Contact the Museum at 936-632-9535 for more information.

Money Trees: The Economic Impact of the Forest Products Industry in East Texas

This exhibit is designed to tell visitors about the amazing number and variety of products that have been manufactured from East Texas trees, from turpentine to toilet seats.

Texas in Flames: A Look at the 2011 Wildfire Season

This exhibit highlights the devastating effect of wildfires. It tells the story of the historic 2011 wildfire season in Texas and features the history of fire prevention, detection, and suppression of wildfires across the state. The Bearing Fire in east Texas and the Bastrop/Lost Pines fire in central Texas serve as focal points for the exhibit. Sponsor: Trinity Neches Forest Landowners Association

Timbertown Trains

Timbertown Trains is an interactive children's exhibit featuring a hands on toy train that helps children learn how trees were cut in the woods and brought to the mill and mill town by rail lines. 

Timbertown Sawmill House

The Timbertown Sawmill House is an interactive children's exhibit that teaches children what life was like for a logger at home in the early 1900's. This exhibit features hands on period-specific items such as clothing, toys and household items.


Permanent Exhibits

Texas trees are not always viewed as icons of the state. The Lone Star State, usually brings visions of cattle, cowboys and oil wells. However, between 1890 and 1900, the timber business of Texas brought more money to the economy of the state than any other industry.

The 14 million acres of the East Texas Pineywoods are still important to Texas. Sawmills, logging railroads, and modern forest management have all influenced East Texas culture. The story of the people, places and products of the Pineywoods are the focus of the exhibits at the Texas Forestry Museum.

Highlights of the permanent exhibits include:

Forest History Wing

  • Tools and equipment related to logging and transportation of logs
  • Steam engine that powered a sawmill
  • Plain and Simple: Sawmill Folks at Home, the story of life in a sawmill town
  • Martin log wagon
  • Texas Forestry Hall of Fame

Resource & Management Wing

  • Fire lookout tower cab
  • 1953 Texas Forest Service Jeep with Fire Plow
  • High Wheel Cart

Paper Mill Room

The story of paper, with special emphasis on Southland Mills Inc. that opened a new industry for the south - newsprint made from southern yellow pine.

Outdoor Exhibits

  • Logging locomotive and tender, log loader and log car, and caboose
  • Sawmill town depot
  • Skidders, tree planters, etc.

Sawmill Doctor Exhibit - Coming Spring 2014

The Texas Forestry Museum announces an upcoming exhibit on sawmill doctors. The exhibit will depict life of a sawmill doctor and his role in a sawmill town. This exhibit is made possible from donations from the Angelina Rotary Club, Rotary International, and the family of Dr. Arthur Bryan. The Bryan family has also donated artifacts for this exhibit. The museum would like to request the help of the public in acquiring additional historical information and artifacts to be included in this exhibit. Please contact the Museum at 936.632.9535 or email info@treetexas.com to discuss contributions for this exhibit.


Collections

The Museum selectively collects and preserves objects, photographs and papers that are determined to be important in interpreting the forests of Texas and the people and products related to the history of the forest industries in Texas.

The Texas Forestry Museum will consider contributions of objects into its permanent collection that meet these goals:

  • Is associated with forestry or the forest products related industries of Texas
  • Is in good condition
  • Is not already over-represented in the collection

If you have an item you think would find a good home in the collections of the Texas Forestry Museum, please contact staff to discuss a possible donation: 936.632.9535, or email us.

View Our Collections >>